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UPDATE: State fines company for safety violations after workers die in Henrico construction fire

rugayira:

in africa the country is usually bribed off in such cases thus no hope for that poor worker

Originally posted on WTVR.com:

fire[1]

HENRICO COUNTY, Va. — The Virginia Department of Labor and Industry has cited a Pennsylvania-based company for eight different safety violations after two construction workers died in a flash fire at a warehouse in Henrico.

The incident happened on Nov. 1 at an empty warehouse located on 7400 Impala Drive in Henrico.

Christian Martoni and Jason Romanczuk were in Henrico doing work for a company called Hadley Construction  based in Pittston, Pennsylvania.

The two were salvaging materials from inside a warehouse that used to house a large printing company called Quebecor.

According to the incident report obtained from the Henrico Fire Department, the men were cutting pipes that once carried printing ink with sparking power tools.

Those tools may have provided an ignition for a chemical that was mixed with the printing ink.

The report said it appears that is what caused a flash fire that burned both victims.

Both the…

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Sembabule, where health centres are deathtraps

it is never a good thing to fall sick anywhere, but in Sembabule district, a very poor healthcare system means that the slightest illness can degenerate into a threat to life.

According to a mini-survey by The Observer, the situation is so bad some people now routinely prefer herbalists and praying to public and private health units here.
Ordinarily, one expects their lives to be saved or bettered when they fall sick and walk into a health centre, hospital or clinic for treatment. In Sembabule, however, a visit to majority of the private health units here is as good as moving closer to one’s grave – according to officials from Uganda’s Allied Health Professionals’ Council (AHPC).

Imagine a clinical officer attempting to clean a bed full of blood with his bare hands! If he does not know the implications of touching another person’s blood, would you trust them during a blood test or transfusion?

That was the shock that Michael Kayizzi, the central region AHPC coordinator, and a group of security personnel were treated to at Henry Fred Bamulanze’s Ssuubi health unit in Mateete town council. The officials were recently on an impromptu operation to scrutinise private health units in parts of Sembabule andMasaka districts.

Despite being merely a clinical officer, Bamulanze claimed to treat all illnesses. He was found with gargets that suggested he was both a gynaecologist as well as a dentist.

“This is the situation in the district but it shows that people’s lives here are in danger,” Kayizzi told The Observer.

“We instructed that man to close his facility a long time ago and get a licence prescribing the type of cases he must handle as a clinical officer but he declined.”

Bamulanze was, once again, ordered to close his clinic forthwith and remain closed for three months, as he looked for a license mandating him to operate. If he declines to adhere to this, Kayizzi said, Bamulanze’s qualification papers may be annulled. More surprises awaited the inspectors. Many health units closed on learning that the inspection was on. In the process, many patients were left locked inside these units.

At Kabundi trading centre in Mateete sub-county, David Matovu was forced to disappear into a nearby bush – leaving 78-year-old Cissy Mbagambamuhinda and a one Herman Sengendo stuck at his health unit. The two were advised to look for other, more professional health centres.

Similar conditions

In neighbouring Masaka, James Kibuule was found operating a clinic in his house, without a licence. Kibuule was once the in-charge of Kimwanyi health centre III for over ten years, before he abandoned his duty without informing district health officers. In addition to poorly disposing of used implements, Kibuule had patients sharing one bed, regardless of their sex or age.

“It is very unprofessional to admit patients of different sexes on the same bed or children sharing beds with adults but it is the order of the day in Kibuule’s clinic,” Kayizzi told The Observer.

Kibuule, however, accused Masaka district health officials of intentionally stepping on his toes by instructing officials from AHPC to intercept his work.

“They are envious of my success. When I was manning Kimwanyi health centre III, a government health unit for over ten years, they did not accuse me of not being qualified. Why are they doing it now after putting up a successful private unit?” Kibuule asked.

But Kayizzi explained that Kibuule abandoned his government duty after learning that operations were coming up to crack down all those who did not have relevant qualifications.

“During those days, it was easy for anyone to forge academic papers and land a government job not only in the health sector but even in other fields. We have learnt of a judge who lost his job for having forged academic documents,” Kayizzi said.

Back to Sembabule, Justine Nabadda was arrested from St Francis drug shop in Mateete town council and Scovia Asiimwe was found illegally operating as a nurse in Victoria health unit, also in Mateete.

They were all handed over to Mateete police station in Sembabule district while Justine Nabakooza, James Kibuule, Florence Nakiyimba and Rehma Nassamula, who were found illegally practising as health workers in Masaka district, were handed over to Masaka police station. They await prosecution. With such a sick private sector, one would expect to find solace in public health units.

But the situation is hardly any better.

Enough but absent

Unlike other districts which lack the required number of health workers paid by government, Sembabule has almost all the required health workers at all levels. The district health officer, Dr James Elima, says that in Sembabule, there are 95 per cent of the required health workers. But to his shock, most of them don’t turn up for their duties, despite the fact that they are fully paid by government.

He believes that this may be one of the reasons why most patients don’t make use of government health units and opt for private ones. He, however, says that although 70 per cent of the private health units in the district are legally recognised, 80 per cent of the people manning these units are quacks who are not eligible to make any attempt on treating human lives.

“The biggest challenge we are facing in this district is politics,” he said. “You may be shocked when a mere LC-1 official attacks you for closing an illegal health unit in his or her area.”

Ugandan journalist working in the United Arab Emirates was recently sacked and deported, after he wrote a book on mistreatment of labourers from poor countries. The Observer has established that until he was sacked, Yasin Kakande worked with the English-language The National, a government newspaper in the UAE capital Abu Dhabi. He was fired for writing an autobiographical novel describing the conditions of migrant workers and media censorship in the United Arab Emirates. According to a report from Reporters Without Borders (RSF), Kakande, 33, had worked for The National for six years when he was fired in April. This came months after the publication of his book, “The Ambitious Struggle: An African Journalist’s Journey of Hope and Identity In A Land of Migrants.” The RSF report, released last month, quotes Kakande as saying that The National’s new editor in chief, Mohamed Al-Otaiba, told him on April 1 that he had committed two offences when he published the book. The first was failing to obtain the management’s permission before publishing the book. The other was showing his employer in the most unfavorable light. He was dismissed with immediate effect, without any notice, forbidden to return to the newspaper’s offices and he was given one month to leave the country. His book, the report said, is on the list of publications banned in the UAE. The newspaper’s management refused to comment when contacted by RSF. Kakande’s book describes the human trafficking, exploitation, abuses, racism and wage discrimination that migrant workers suffer in the UAE. Kakande’s revelations in the book, tally with complaints made by many Ugandans working in UAE, mainly in Dubai, and other places. Many Ugandans claim they are abused and treated inhumanly. Others claim their passports are often confiscated and turned into sex slaves. The book shines a bright light on the sex trafficking of most migrant women in Dubai. The book highlights tales of sex workers that no decent human being would wish to hear. According to the book, women are bought and sold as chattels and their passports confiscated by pimps on arrival to Dubai. The women remain trapped in the brothels of their pimps, abused by greedy punters. They live in fear of being beaten up if they disobey their masters or being deported if they report their ordeals. They face gang rapes or are forced to sleep with animals, a practice some cultures in Dubai would allow despite all the evidence of progressive modernity and religious conservatism. One sex worker quoted in the book told Kakande that they would rather die than continue living a life of semi-human and another one vowed never to have children because they feel their wombs are filled with animal semen. Kakande also told the Migrants Rights Organisation in a statement published online titled; “So, who fired me?” that his bosses acknowledged that they were terminating him before they even read the book, an indication that they were prevailed upon by high-ups. “As journalists, we should not leave the poor immigrant workers on their own to fight the struggle for their rights,” he told RSF. “How many stories that would have communicated the plight of workers have we decided instead to report in small story briefs or to trash completely because we feared enraging those in authority and getting fired?” The section of the book titled “Reporting from Dubai” describes the censorship and self-censorship prevailing in the UAE’s media and how their executives are in practice an integral part of the government’s censorship system. In Chapter 35, page 141, he writes: “All the PR who worked for companies owned by the ruling families thought they were the sheikhs’ de facto censorship arm.” Describing the media as “co-opted” on page 145, he shows that journalism is not easy in a country where secrets must not be exposed and certain subjects must be avoided. Kakande recounts Mohiudin Bin Hendi’s first measures on taking over as the head of City 7 TV in May 2007. “He announced a ban on covering all political stories, saying that he never wanted to clash with the country’s leadership. He was instructing us with immediate effect to put an end to police, court, or other politically-related stories”. The Commandant Aviation Police Lodovick Awita told The Observer if a person is deported after committing an offence in a different country, there is no reason to act against him or her. “Unless, when police have interest in the case or have been asked to interrogate him or her,” he said.Ugandan journalist sacked over critical book

Ambrose

Ugandan journalist working in the United Arab Emirates was recently sacked and deported, after he wrote a book on mistreatment of laborers from poor countries.

The Observer has established that until he was sacked, Yasin Kakande worked with the English-language The National, a government newspaper in the UAE capital Abu Dhabi.

He was fired for writing an autobiographical novel describing the conditions of migrant workers and media censorship in the United Arab Emirates.

According to a report from Reporters Without Borders (RSF), Kakande, 33, had worked for The National for six years when he was fired in April. This came months after the publication of his book, “The Ambitious Struggle: An African Journalist’s Journey of Hope and Identity In A Land of Migrants.”

The RSF report, released last month, quotes Kakande as saying that The National’s new editor in chief, Mohamed Al-Otaiba, told him on April 1 that he had committed two offences when he published the book.

The first was failing to obtain the management’s permission before publishing the book. The other was showing his employer in the most unfavorable light.

He was dismissed with immediate effect, without any notice, forbidden to return to the newspaper’s offices and he was given one month to leave the country. His book, the report said, is on the list of publications banned in the UAE. The newspaper’s management refused to comment when contacted by RSF.

Kakande’s book describes the human trafficking, exploitation, abuses, racism and wage discrimination that migrant workers suffer in the UAE. Kakande’s revelations in the book, tally with complaints made by many Ugandans working in UAE, mainly in Dubai, and other places. Many Ugandans claim they are abused and treated inhumanly. Others claim their passports are often confiscated and turned into sex slaves.

The book shines a bright light on the sex trafficking of most migrant women in Dubai. The book highlights tales of sex workers that no decent human being would wish to hear. According to the book, women are bought and sold as chattels and their passports confiscated by pimps on arrival to Dubai. The women remain trapped in the brothels of their pimps, abused by greedy punters.

They live in fear of being beaten up if they disobey their masters or being deported if they report their ordeals. They face gang rapes or are forced to sleep with animals, a practice some cultures in Dubai would allow despite all the evidence of progressive modernity and religious conservatism. One sex worker quoted in the book told Kakande that they would rather die than continue living a life of semi-human and another one vowed never to have children because they feel their wombs are filled with animal semen.

Kakande also told the Migrants Rights Organization in a statement published online titled; “So, who fired me?” that his bosses acknowledged that they were terminating him before they even read the book, an indication that they were prevailed upon by high-ups.

“As journalists, we should not leave the poor immigrant workers on their own to fight the struggle for their rights,” he told RSF.

“How many stories that would have communicated the plight of workers have we decided instead to report in small story briefs or to trash completely because we feared enraging those in authority and getting fired?”

The section of the book titled “Reporting from Dubai” describes the censorship and self-censorship prevailing in the UAE’s media and how their executives are in practice an integral part of the government’s censorship system.

In Chapter 35, page 141, he writes: “All the PR who worked for companies owned by the ruling families thought they were the sheikhs’ de facto censorship arm.” Describing the media as “co-opted” on page 145, he shows that journalism is not easy in a country where secrets must not be exposed and certain subjects must be avoided.

Kakande recounts Mohiudin Bin Hendi’s first measures on taking over as the head of City 7 TV in May 2007. “He announced a ban on covering all political stories, saying that he never wanted to clash with the country’s leadership. He was instructing us with immediate effect to put an end to police, court, or other politically-related stories”.

The Commandant Aviation Police Lodovick Awita told The Observer  if  a person is deported after committing an offence in a different country, there is no reason to act against him or her.

“Unless, when police have interest in the case or have been asked to interrogate him or her,” he said.

Besigye links terror acts to oppression

Former FDC president says most terrorists are the weak who are being oppressed by the strong powers

Kampala- Former Forum for Democratic Change president Kizza Besigye has said the modern-day interpretation of terrorism is selfish, misleading and is only aimed at frustrating the pursuit of justice.

“What is regarded as terrorism today is, in fact, a situation in which someone who is too weak is suffering oppression and is desperately seeking justice against an excessively strong oppressor,” Dr Besigye said.

He was speaking during the closing session of the annual Ramadan seminars organised by the Uganda Muslim Youth Association (UMYA) at Kibuli Teachers Training College on Sunday.

Dr Besigye told the gathering that it is wrong to link terrorism to Islam saying it is not only a selfish but also a misleading perception.
“Show me anywhere in the world, where there is terrorism and the so-called terrorist is not a victim of oppression and injustice?” he asked.

Dr Besigye added that what is happening in the Middle East is a true reflection of a situation where ones’ desperate pursuit of justice makes him branded a terrorist.

He wondered why in Gaza, it is Israel that uses superior weaponry to kill scores of Palestinians but instead it is the latter, who use stones in response, that have been branded terrorists by the Western powers.

Dr Besigye also reiterated his message which was centered on the need to change the people’s mindset in finding change.

“Overthrowing the current regime is just part of the bigger campaign. What is paramount is an overhaul of the people’s mindset – showing them their role in determining how they wish to be governed,” he said attracting a thunderous applause.

“No matter how many constitutional reviews we make, we cannot get a quantitative change when our power is held by manipulators. Power belongs to the people.”

 
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AMBER Alert cancelled for three-year-old Tommy Lee Able Engle

rugayira:

thanks ,young boy is safe and sound

Originally posted on WTVR.com:

PATRICK COUNTY, Va. — The AMBER Alert issued Tuesday for three-year-old Tommy Lee Able Engle has been cancelled.

Engle was found unharmed in Pike County, Kentucky. His father, 34-year-old Tommy Lee Travis Engle, was taken into custody.

This is a developing story.

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